Nomadic Expeditions

Mongolia’s Naadam Festival

DESTINATION: NAADAM GAMES

DESTINATION: NAADAM GAMES

Mongolia’s Naadam Festival

Naadam means to come together as one and have a celebration. A spectacle of pageantry and cultural performances, the centerpiece of this journey will lift your spirits and fill your heart. Bear witness to the height of these competitions during the nation’s largest Naadam Games in the capital of Ulaanbaatar.

Nomadic Lands

Nomadic Lands Through the Lens: Mongolia in Focus

Nomadic Lands Through the Lens: Mongolia in Focus

Nomadic Lands

Whether you’re a professional photographer or a world traveler with only a passing appreciation for photography, the beauty of nomadic people and lands is unmistakable—and incredibly alluring—calling you to explore these gorgeous settings and cultures for yourself.

UNESCO SItes - Nomadic Expeditions - Mongolia

UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Mongolia

UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Mongolia

UNESCO SItes - Nomadic Expeditions - Mongolia

Mongolia proudly has five such sites, with another 12 on the tentative list. Ranging from relatively small monument sites to vast tracts of natural landscape, these locations embody Mongolia’s heritage as our legacy and key to our past—places we absolutely must pass on to future generations—irreplaceable cultural and natural sources of life and inspiration.

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Where Eagles Soar

Where Eagles Soar

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Mongolian Eagle Hunting: Sport of the Khans For more than a thousand years, the nomadic people of western Mongolia have practiced this ancient art of golden eagle falconry by training young eaglets and hunting with these majestic birds. Trekking on horseback over unforgiving terrain in frigid temperatures, these hunters work in teams to flush quarry—fox

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Mongolian Throat Singing Demystified

Mongolian Throat Singing Demystified

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Mongolian Throat Singing Demystified No one can say for sure when the art form of throat singing began. The historical records mention it as early as the Han Dynasty, between 206 – 220 BC. Throat singing then appears in Chinese texts dating in 92 AD. From these accounts, we learn that the northern barbarians who